15 thoughts on “Oh Boy….

  1. Daniel Castelli

    The poor Leicas: like a dog with a cone about it’s head. Embarrassed to be seen outside.
    Makes a Lenny Kravitz Leica look normal.

    Reply
      1. Rob Campbell

        Well Stephen, kinky boots or not, those painted hussies will never let you down with an effin’ locked up mirror!

        Today, I decided to attempt to remove a rather violent-looking bunnie from my old D200. Rather than as a bunny, it looked like a small twig. I managed to get the job done, using nothing but an old blower bulb device I once bought for cleaning trannies instead of a brush. (Don’t think it worked very well for that, but the bulb thing was kept anyway, perhaps due to its mildy erotic tactile sensation when squezed.)

        The bunny had revealed itself when I used a 500 cat lens the other day or week, and f8 is not a good aperture for allowing bunnies to remain secret. Anyway, bunny vanquished, I decided to give the better, almost never used D700 a test to see if it, too, had a hidden warren. Never got that far: moments after I put in the fully-charged battery I tried to make a shot and the screen was black. It remains black now, hours and countless attempts in different combinations of exposure later. I consulted Doc Google and it turns out that dozens of cameras do that, even the D810 and D850 have had the problem… Never happened to me with any camera before. Can’t even be worth the cost of repair and shipping, despite being almost unused, which may be part of the problem. Another paperweight joins the club. (And also another reminder not to save a Sunday suit for special occasions. I own one suit, bought for funerals; altruistically, as usual, I hope that the next time I wear it I won’t know.)

        Could read as a subliminal ad for mirrorless cameras such as the Z series, but hey, in return for no mirror you get more bunnies either directly on the sensor or, alternatively, on the glass in the ones that have it. And to think I never change lenses except indoors!

        Oscar must be grinning in his box.

        Reply
  2. Lee Rust

    It does seem like a waste of some perfectly good classic cameras, but we’re living in a cartoon world now, so they fit right in.

    Reply
    1. Rob Campbell

      Well put. I often feel as if I am the only one still not sipping the potion; increasingly, I find that I want to convert my perfectly good colour slides to black and white. Colour really does appear as a great intrusion that distracts and disguises. Unless one wants to create pictures that depend on colour for commercial reasons, that is. Then, it’s perfectly legitimate. To avoid controversy: I fully accept that OMMD.

      I had a set of ten prints scanned yesterday (too large for my little office printer’s plate), and working on the stuff that I was given for my euros is quite depressing. In fact, I have had to do exactly what I mentioned above: give some of the reproduced images a tint in order disguise the actual tonal poverty of them as third- or second-generation black/whites. That’s the cookie that crumbles onto your lap when you do a Bassman and Duffy on your negatives: you’re screwed.

      🙁

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *