Renouncing the Digital Feedback Loop (Reclaiming Your Autonomy from Technology)

A sloppy, irresolute photo taken with a film camera

Photographs are everywhere, and it’s easy to lose sight, or not even see, their reality as things in themselves. Most people have a simple way of understanding photographs, as reflections of existing  states of things. The belief is this: photos represent the world itself, even if they are windows from a particular point of view; the photographic world and the world out there are essentially the same. I call this the ‘naïve’ view of photography.

This naïve view begs the question, of course, of what to do about black and white photography. Most things “out there in the world” are not exclusively black and white or tones thereof. So, black and white photography, even within a naïve view, is an abstraction.

What of color? Well, we can agree that the color of the scene presented doesn’t miraculously transfer itself onto a roll of film or a sensor. The process of “reproducing” color photographically is a transcription, the same as any other image making process, an attempt to ‘re- create’ a state of things via an abstraction. Like any abstraction, what is transcribed and the transcription itself will always vary to some extent even when the intent is to be as “accurate” as possible. How its ‘re-created’ is a function of two things – the choices and skill of the photographer and the potential offered by the tools one uses.

So, if photos are abstractions, we have to, in the jargon of semiotics, ‘decode’ them (make the intention behind them understandable), because ultimately photographs are about communicating something. How do we do that? As a photographer and not a philosopher, I’d suggest that a successful photograph is one where the photographer’s intention has been realized, where a human’s intention overrides any intentions inherent in the camera itself.

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Flusser-Foto1

Vilém Flusser was a Czech born philosopher of language and communication who wrote verbose philosophical tomes no one reads anymore, assuming they ever did (that’s him, above). In 1983, prior to the digital age, Flusser wrote Fur Eine Philosophie der Fotografie (Towards a Philosophy of Photography) in which he argues that cameras themselves have intentions (I presume, were you to cut through the ponderous academic jargon, he’s really talking about camera manufacturers driven by profit motives). He lists them as follows:

  •  to place the camera’s inherent capabilities into a photograph;
  • to make use of a photographer;
  • to create a feedback relationship between photographers and the camera and its products which creates progressive technological improvement so as to produce “better” photographs;
  • to produce “better” photographs.

All of which is to say, in common parlance, that the photographic tools you use and the capabilities they offer you will tend to structure the types of photographs you produce with them, by naturally pushing you in the direction of utilizing what they (the photographic tool), not you, might do best.  Examples of this phenomenon would be the “bokeh” craze currently all the rage with a certain type of gearhead, or the current fetish for sharpness, where the benchmark of the “quality” of a photograph is determined by how resolute your corners are.

Maybe it’s just me, but photographic aesthetics seem to have changed markedly since the inception of digital photography, to my mind for the worse. Optical characteristics have increasingly replaced emotional resonance as the criterion of a “good” photograph, the result of a repressive stranglehold of sharpness and resolution on the photographic imagination which is itself driven by the particular characteristics of digital capture. Flusser would say that the camera has made use of the photographer, its intentions having triumphed over the potential intentions of the human, the result of the inevitable feedback loop between tool and user. I would add that, as far as creative possibilities are concerned, this is a step back rather than a step forward.

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Of course, you could argue that the same logic applies to traditional film photography, and you’d be correct up to a certain point. The types of photographs you’re able to take with film also structure the results you get. With film photography that structuring typically takes the form of limits on what you can do, circumscribing your ability to take photos in certain situations or producing results within a limited aesthetic spectrum, setting the parameters within which the photographer must work as opposed to actively pushing him in a certain direction. There’s a big difference.

Above is a photograph by Antonin Kratochvil, a Czech born photographer and a personal favorite of mine. He’s long been known in journalism circles for his idiosyncratic approach, both technologically and aesthetically. Fellow photographer Michael Perrson describes seeing Kratochvil in a Croatian refugee camp using two old Nikons with beat-up, generic 28mm lenses, cameras “that looked like they could no more be traded for a pack of chewing gum than be a tool to make professional photos,” other photographers snickering at the Eastern European hack. Pictures he shot there would find their way into Broken Dreams, his award-winning monograph of the ecological devastation of Soviet era Eastern Europe.

As Perrson notes, what makes Kratochvil a great photographer is not his equipment but rather his unique sensibility. “He believes in the craft of photography, the skill and the ability of the photographer not to let his tools control his actions.” This simplicity releases in him the freedom to see things in unique ways. Kratochvil himself laments the ever-increasing incursions of technology into the photographic process – “technology has made it so that anyone can take ‘competent’ photos. It follows that if anyone can do this, where is the respect?” For Kratochvil, the camera is simply a tool; seeing is what’s important, and a given state of technology should never compel you to see the world in any given way.

Kratochvil strikes me as a very wise man in addition to being a superb photographer. But I’m certain that most smug digital technocrats, those whom digital precision and technical perfection have led by the nose, will find his work naive and technically amateurish, as if that was the sole criterion on which photography might be judged. Such dismissiveness is the tribute the inadequate pay to the articulate.

9 thoughts on “Renouncing the Digital Feedback Loop (Reclaiming Your Autonomy from Technology)

  1. Rob Campbell

    Perhaps there’s another thing to point out: the same photographer is perfectly able to make the image he makes using a 135-format film camera with his alternative 135-format digital one, if not always the other way around. I would have expected this to be even more obvious to people in the Leica world.

    As indicated in the article, it’s about mind and eye, and that is not a dominant camera function unless you want it to be. I could honestly say that my day-to-day photography was affected more by changing back and forth from my film Nikons to the film ‘blads, simply due to format and its induced differences, than to tricks in my head. In fact, I avoided mixing formats on any given job as firmly as I could. So, to sum up, format is often far more influential on the look of images than film/digital decisions.

    Rob

  2. Andrew

    I enjoy the tools, both and old, and often mixing them up. My favorite portrait combination is a digital Leica (M-E or CCD M Monochrom at the moment) and a positively ancient lens made in 1937 without coating and with air bubbles in the glass (Zeiss 5cm f/1.5 Sonnar). This combination of old and new is terrific fun, and produces beautiful results.

  3. Reed Loefgren

    “Reclaiming Your Autonomy from Technology”

    And yet in four posts it’s become a gear thread.

    s-a

  4. Rob Campbell

    Reed,

    That’s a bit harsh!

    I don’t think anything not covered in the OP has be broached:

    “Maybe it’s just me, but photographic aesthetics seem to have changed markedly since the inception of digital photography, to my mind for the worse. Optical characteristics have increasingly replaced emotional resonance as the criterion of a “good” photograph, the result of a repressive stranglehold of sharpness and resolution on the photographic imagination which is itself driven by the particular characteristics of digital capture.”

    ” “what makes Kratochvil a great photographer is not his equipment but rather his unique sensibility. “He believes in the craft of photography, the skill and the ability of the photographer not to let his tools control his actions.” ”

    It’s silly intentiionally to avoid certain factors that go to make the entire eqation; you’d then be playing with less than a full pack of cards…

    😉

    Rob

    1. Reed Loefgren

      Rob,

      Harsh? There are hundreds of photographic forums awash in gear discussions, some devoted to only that and some even charging non-trivial subscription fees for their content. Leicaphilia (if I may be so bold), while concentrating on the film/digital divide and even inferring there’s a proper side to be on, tends to stay away from hardware as _the_ answer. That’s Marketing’s job; to push ever more trivial advances as the next big thing you have to have. It’s the retail analog to searching for Ansel Adams’s tripod holes. There’s more than enough of that on the internet, and I was attracted to Leicaphilia because here was a site that had more than a little philosophical introspection to explaining its devotion to a particularly anachronistic device and the medium it used, while not shying away from its obvious “flaws”. Some damn good imagery to boot.

      Almost all great photography is a solitary endeavor. You put your work out there and it takes its lumps. Sometimes it shows one a Path. A painter’s work might be recognized by its brush strokes but it’s a foolish painter indeed who gives credit (or blame) to the brushes.

      Harsh? I think not. Even if, harshness and respect are not mutually exclusive.

      Best,
      Reed

  5. San Warzoné

    In the creative world of photography everyone has their own taste and preferences…you’re into film, I’m using digital. Why then does there need to be a winner and loser? Do you really believe that a digital camera is going to dictate and push me in a direction that some camera maufacturer has designed? That the use of a digital camera has a “repressive stranglehold on sharpness and resolution on the photographic imagination” which will predetermine what and how I create my images? Is this your take on digital “capture”? “Photographic tools you use and the capabilities they offer you will tend to structure the types of photographs you produce with them, by naturally pushing you in the direction of utilizing what they (the photographic tool), not you, might do best.” If you support the idea that it’s the “craft of photography, the skill and the ability of the photographer and not to let his tools (camera) control his actions” then why not give a digital photographer the same credit? It sounds like you’re the one “snickering” at fellow digital photographers.

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